How to write a credit report dispute letter

A well written credit report dispute letter can be of great value when it comes to clearing up your issues on your credit report. No one really looks forward to dealing with the credit bureaus but an appropriately written dispute letter can really assist you in getting a loan, or a new home, and in some cases even a job.

While credit bureaus are sometimes intimidating and the mountain of paperwork the send your way may be time-consuming and frustrating, you'll find the hassle well worth it when your credit report is cleared.

Your credit report dispute letter should follow standard letter writing guidelines while including a few things that the credit bureau specifically will need in order to take action on your dispute. This article will go through each part of the letter and let you know what should be included and how it should look on the page.

First, don't worry if you don't have a computer at your disposal. In fact, there are definite advatages to a handwritten letter. When the credit bueaue receives a letter that has been written by hand they know it's from an individual who is working on their credit and not from a credit repair organization. Letters written on typewriter are also ok.

The top of the page

 

In the upper left-hand corner of the page, you should always include your name, address and telephone number in that order. If you have an email address, it's a good idea to include it below your telephone number. It s highly important to list your Social Security number when dealing with the credit bureau. That s the bureau's most reliable way of connecting your letter to your report.

It should be placed below your email address (if you have one) or below your telephone number (if you don't have an email address). Two spaces below all this information, you should write or type the credit bureau's name and address. The date should be located two spaces below the credit bureau's address

Body of the Letter

 

Now it's time to get to the meat of your letter. A salutation such as "To Whom It May Concern:" is generally safe and will work as a greeting to whoever may be reading your letter. This should come two spaces after the date, and the letter text should come two spaces after the salutation.

In the body of your letter, it's important to keep your tone courteous and straightforward. If there are multiple errors in your report, you should list each one in its own paragraph. State your needs simply so as to avoid any unneeded complications. Also, be sure to call the bureau to action and let them know what you need them to do: "Please remove this item from my credit report."

Two lines below the body text of your letter, you should end with a signoff such as "Sincerely" or "Thank you." Your professionalism and courtesy will be appreciated by the credit bureau employees, as they deal with dispute letters regularly. Don't forget to sign your name and write in print or type or name below where your signature will be.

Things to Remember

 

In the upper left-hand corner of the page, you should always include your name, address and telephone number in that order. If you have an email address, it's good to include it as well below your telephone number. Because you're dealing with a credit bureau, it's imperative that you also list your Social Security number-this is the bureau's most reliable way of connecting your letter to your report. It should be placed below your email address (if you have one) or below your telephone number (if you don't have an email address). Two spaces below all this information, you should write or type the credit bureau's name and address. The date should be located two spaces below the credit bureau's address.

  • If there's something wrong with your identifying information, correct it at the beginning of your letter before going into any errors you need to dispute.
  • Remember that you are just beginning the process and understand that before the item(s) in question are changed, you may need to write many more letters.
  • As soon as you receive a letter from the credit bureau, follow up with a letter of your own. The process of correcting errors can be a long one, and you can speed it up by communicating quickly and effectively.
  • As stated earlier, professionalism and courtesy are necessary if you want to get results. State your needs clearly, and never threaten the credit bureau.
  • The item(s) you are disputing should be clear and specific and should use words such as erroneous, outdated, misleading, and unverifiable. It won't do to explain your situation and ask for the credit bureau's sympathy-you need to state a reason why the listing(s) in question is wrong, unverifiable, or not yours

See an example Dispute Letter